Stress and Tinnitus

Stress and Tinnitus

Stress is something we all have to live with. It’s how we deal with what goes on in our lives that matters. Stress can be associated with both good and bad events. For example, celebrating the birth of a child or making a move to a new state can both be happy events. But even happy events can cause stress – and the stress associated with life changes affect our physical selves.

Any stress you experience has a reaction inside your body. Stress raises the blood pressure and makes the heart work harder at ordinary tasks. Stress can cause stomach problems and problems concentrating. Stress can also cause us to lose sleep, which affects our health and can worsen any physical ailments.

People who have tinnitus deal with a different level of stress because stress can ratchet up their symptoms. Since tinnitus can be a chronic condition, it can lead to feeling depressed that their tinnitus will never go away. Stress can cause people with tinnitus to lose sleep – and this compounds the stress because insomnia makes the condition worse.

Stress interacts with tinnitus in a negative way. One of the ways it interacts is by causing the ringing (or other sounds) in the ear to last longer and rise in frequency of noise level. For people who live with tinnitus, stress management techniques are a must have.

If you do have the condition, to lessen the stress in your life, learn techniques that can minimize or eliminate the fallout from the stress. This will include things like meditation or yoga.

Both of these teach people the art of relaxing and letting go. Yoga helps lower feelings of anxiety and it helps level out your blood pressure. Another stress relieving technique is to verbally release any of the anxieties you feel in any area of life.

Share your anxieties with someone trained in the art of stress management, such as a therapist. Taking steady, deep breaths can help patients learn how to exhale the stress and relax. Some people with tinnitus use hypnosis sessions as a way of dealing with the condition.

Getting physical with exercise helps the body with circulation. It can improve poor blood flow, which has been linked to tinnitus symptoms. Exercise can also help you get a good night’s sleep so you get the rest your body needs.

If you’ve discovered that your tinnitus is suddenly worse than what it used to be, examine your life for any areas of stress and deal with them quickly so you can get back to enjoying your life and all of the sounds that come with it.

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